Posts

Recent work on the origin of the Greek constellations

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Rock carvings at Yazilikaya, Hattusa, thought to represent a lunisolar calendar, ~ 2000 BCE Following further research into the origin of the Greek constellations, I quote below from the introduction to a very recent (2022) article by Kechagias and Hoffmann "Intercultural Misunderstandings as a possible Source of Ancient Constellations" . Constellations are a very popular topic with which we deal in any planetarium  show and astronomy textbook -- unfortunately in most cases only by summaris ing ancient fairy tales. The real origins of the constellations are hardly known.  Undoubtedly, today's constellations are rooted in the ancient Greek tradition of  Ptolemy's Almagest (Delporte 1930). However, the origin of the 48 ancient constellations  of the Almagest remain largely enigmatic in contrast to the modern  southern constellations, where the exact place, date and way of their invention  is known (Ridpath 1988, Hoffmann 2021d, Frank 2015, 148-149). There  has been much

Interview with Jordan Youkilis on his "Entangled" podcast

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 Available on  spotify . Enjoy.

The Archaeology of Cosmic Impact - by Marc Young

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Marc Young is an outstanding young archaeologist studying at Flinders University, South Australia. Like me, he has long held an interest in cosmic impacts and their effect on humanity. He created the Tusk's bibliography  which helped me to write my r eview article and create a series of YouTube videos outlining the science of the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis. It's great to see archaeologists are now taking this novel scenario, of fragile comet fragments that tend to burst high in the atmosphere, seriously. This scenario has long been overlooked by those in esteemed positions who hold themselves responsible for creating the story of our past. Marc recently published an excellent article for his local archaeological society's magazine that is well worth reading. Marc has also written a superb article on pseudoarchaeology , published on Graham Hancock's website. It is very highly recommended! Marc has experienced directly the dogma of University of Kansas professor J

Update to Lunisolar paper

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My 'Lunisolar' paper submitted earlier this year has been reviewed and revised. See below for the revised version. It is provided here with permission of the journal. I expect this will be sent for review again... Likely  lunisolar calendar systems at G ö bekli Tepe and Karahan Tepe Martin B. Sweatman Institute of Materials and Processes, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, King’s Buildings, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. EH9 3JL. email: martin.sweatman@ed.ac.uk Competing interests: The author declares there are no competing interests.   ABSTRACT G ö bekli Tepe is a remarkable ancient archaeological site  belonging to the Ta ş  Tepeler culture  in southern Turkey  that features  several sub-circular temple-like enclosures adorned with many carved symbols. Earlier work provided an astronomical interpretation for some of its symbolism. Here, that earlier interpretation is  supported and  extended by showing how V-symbols on Pillar 43 in Enclosure D can be interpreted in ter